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git-rebase-conflicts

Resolving git rebase conflicts

A note about terminology

This article is about git rebase conflicts. A similar article with slightly different technical details could be written for git merge conflicts. I use “merge” as a non-technical term for combining the content of two different repository states, not to refer to git mergeing specifically.

Introduction

When a git rebase conflict occurs you will be presented with a conflict region (or “hunk”) that shows why the rebased commit couldn’t be applied to the base branch. To resolve a rebase conflict, your task is to apply the logically-intended (i.e. semantic) change of the rebased commit to the base branch.

Some merge tools (for example Emacs SMerge) offer you the option to “keep their changes” or “keep our changes”. This is almost always wrong. The whole point of merging (remember, I’m using that word in the non-technical sense, not to refer to git mergeing specifically) is to combine two conflicting things, not to choose one over the other. By choosing one you ignore a change in the other that may be required by other parts of the same commit (parts that may not see because they merged without conflict!).

The existence of a conflict means that the patches could not be merged textually. However, the aim is actually to merge them semantically. Merge tools are rarely (perhaps never) clever enough to be able to perform semantic merges so they settle for textual merges. In the cases where textual merges are not possible the task is left to human ingenuity.

Key takeaway: the aim is to apply the logical (i.e. semantic) content of the rebased commit to the base branch.

Summary of the conflict resolution procedure

Resolving a rebase conflict requires understanding the logically intended (semantic) change of the rebased commit and applying it manually to the base branch. Here is the procedure to follow. The details will be explained by way of example later.

  1. Issue the git rebase command.

    Use the diff3 conflict style option because it shows important information in the conflict markers that would otherwise be absent.

    git -c merge.conflictStyle=diff3 rebase ...
  2. For each conflict, observe the logical change that the rebased commit was intended to make.

    • Either look at the difference between the middle hunk section and the bottom hunk section of the marked conflict, or

    • look at git show REBASE_HEAD

  3. Observe the state of the base branch at each conflict region.

    • Either look at the top hunk section of the marked conflict, or

    • look at git show HEAD:<filename>

  4. Apply, to the base branch, the logical change that the rebased commit was intended to make.

    This will probably be easiest to do by editing the top hunk section of the conflict and then deleting the others.

  5. Add the file and continue the rebase, with git add and

    git -c merge.conflictStyle=diff3 rebase --continue

Example file

The examples will based on changes to this example Python file.

def foo1():
    print("foo1")

def foo2():
    print("foo2")

def foo3():
    print("foo3")

def foo4():
    print("foo4")

def foo5():
    print("foo5")

def main():
    foo1()
    foo2()
    foo3()

Worked example: adding two different things

Suppose I have a patch that adds a call of foo4 and another patch that adds a call of foo5, that is

 def main():
     foo1()
     foo2()
     foo3()
+    foo4()

and

 def main():
     foo1()
     foo2()
     foo3()
+    foo5()

If I try to rebase the latter on the former then the result is a conflict. The conflict is marked in the file by conflict markers, as below. This is sometimes referred to as a “hunk”. There are three sections in the hunk:

  1. Between <<< and |||: the state of the base branch, i.e. what the rebase commit actually saw when it tried to apply its change

  2. Between ||| and ===: the state that the rebased commit expected to see

  3. Between === and >>>: what the result of applying the rebased commit would have been, if it had seen what it expected

These three sections are always different from each other. If any pair were the same then there would be no conflict!

      foo1()
      foo2()
      foo3()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo4()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++=======
+    foo5()
++>>>>>>> Add foo 5

The intent of the rebased commit

There are two equivalent ways to see the logical intent of the rebased commit.

     foo1()
     foo2()
     foo3()
+    foo5()

Using either method you can see that the logical change of the rebased commit is to add foo5() after foo3().

The state of the base branch

There are two equivalent ways to see the state of the base branch.

...
def main():
    foo1()
    foo2()
    foo3()
    foo4()

Either way, you can see that the base branch has foo4() after foo3().

Resolving the conflict

The correct way to resolve this conflict is to apply the logical change of the rebased commit—adding foo5() after foo3()—to state of the base branch—which has foo4() after foo3(). In your editor this will typically be easiest to do by making the change to the top hunk section and then deleting the other hunk sections. It requires semantic understanding to know exactly which way of resolving the conflict is satisfactory, if any. For example, we could put foo5() either before or after the appearance of foo4(). Let’s choose the latter and add foo5() below foo4() in the top hunk section (i.e. below HEAD).

      foo1()
      foo2()
      foo3()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo4()
 +    foo5()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++=======
+    foo5()
++>>>>>>> Add foo 5

and then delete the middle and bottom hunk sections, and the conflict markers, to get

def main():
    foo1()
    foo2()
    foo3()
    foo4()
    foo5()

Once this change has been made the file can be git added and the rebase can continue via git rebase --continue.

Worked example: removing two different things

Suppose I have a patch that removes the call of foo2 and another patch that removes the call of foo3, that is

def main():
     foo1()
-    foo2()
     foo3()

and

 def main():
     foo1()
     foo2()
-    foo3()

If I try to rebase the latter onto the former the conflict is

      foo1()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo3()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
+     foo2()
++    foo3()
++=======
++    foo2()
++>>>>>>> Remove foo3

The intent of the rebased commit

By looking at the difference between the middle hunk section and the bottom hunk section, or by looking at git show REBASE_HEAD—which shows

 def main():
     foo1()
     foo2()
-    foo3()

—we can see that the intent of the rebased patch was to remove foo3().

The state of the base branch

On the other hand, the hunk section under HEAD, and git show HEAD:<filename>—which is

def main():
    foo1()
    foo3()

—show that the base branch does not contain foo2(), but foo3() is still there, ripe for removal. We need to apply the logical intent of the rebased patch to this context, which is done by removing the appearance of foo3() in the hunk section below HEAD

      foo1()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
++||||||| merged common ancestors
+     foo2()
++    foo3()
++=======
++    foo2()
++>>>>>>> Remove foo3

and then we delete the middle and bottom hunk sections and the conflict markers to get

def main():
    foo1()

Worked example: one addition, one removal

If I rebase the addition of foo4() on the removal of foo3() the conflict is

  def main():
      foo1()
      foo2()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++    foo3()
++=======
+     foo3()
+     foo4()
++>>>>>>> Add foo4

git show REBASE_HEAD shows

     foo1()
     foo2()
     foo3()
+    foo4()

so the intention of the rebased commit is to add foo4(). Doing this in the top hunk section (i.e. below HEAD) leads to

  def main():
      foo1()
      foo2()
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo4()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++    foo3()
++=======
+     foo3()
+     foo4()
++>>>>>>> Add foo4

and after deleting the deleting the other hunk sections we are left with

def main():
    foo1()
    foo2()
    foo4()

Worked example: a renaming and a removal

Suppose I rename foo1 to foo1_new_name like so

-def foo1():
+def foo1_new_name():
     print("foo1")

...

 def main():
-    foo1()
+    foo1_new_name()
     foo2()
     foo3()

and rebase the removal of foo2() (as above) on top. Then the conflict markers show

  def main():
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo1_new_name()
 +    foo2()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
+     foo1()
++    foo2()
++=======
++    foo1()
++>>>>>>> Remove foo2
      foo3()

and git show REBASE_HEAD shows

def main():
     foo1()
-    foo2()
     foo3()

Therefore to apply the logical intent of the rebased commit I need to remove foo2(). Doing so in the top hunk section gives

  def main():
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo1_new_name()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
+     foo1()
++    foo2()
++=======
++    foo1()
++>>>>>>> Remove foo2
      foo3()

and after deleting the other hunk sections and conflict markers we are left with

def main():
    foo1_new_name()
    foo3()

Worked example: a renaming and an extraction

Suppose I rebase the patch changing foo1 to foo1_new_name as above onto a commit which combines foo1 and foo2 into a new function called foo1and2 like so

 def foo2():
     print("foo2")

+def foo1and2():
+    foo1()
+    foo2()
+
 def foo3():
     print("foo3")

...

 def main():
-    foo1()
-    foo2()
+    foo1and2()
     foo3()

The conflict is

  def main():
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo1and2()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++    foo1()
++    foo2()
++=======
+     foo1_new_name()
+     foo2()
++>>>>>>> Rename foo1 to foo1_new_name
      foo3()

What was the logical intent of the rebased commit? git show REBASE_HEAD shows

-def foo1():
+def foo1_new_name():
     print("foo1")

...

 def main():
-    foo1()
+    foo1_new_name()
     foo2()
     foo3()

so the logical intent is to rename foo1 to foo1_new_name. This poses a conundrum. There is no way to make this change within the conflict region itself! The call of foo1 has been moved into a different function. We must make the change there instead, leading to a final result of

def foo1and2():
    foo1_new_name()
    foo2()

...

def main():
    foo1and2()
    foo3()

Worked example: a semantic conflict

Suppose we renamed foo1 as above and then tried to rebase upon it a commit that renames foo1 to something else. The conflict would look something like

++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +def foo1_new_name():
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++def foo1():
++=======
+ def foo1_another_new_name():
++>>>>>>> Rename foo1 again
      print("foo1")

...

  def main():
++<<<<<<< HEAD
 +    foo1_new_name()
++||||||| merged common ancestors
++    foo1()
++=======
+     foo1_another_new_name()
++>>>>>>> Rename foo1 again
      foo2()
      foo3()

git show REBASE_HEAD shows

-def foo1():
+def foo1_another_new_name():
     print("foo1")

...

 def main():
-    foo1()
+    foo1_another_new_name()
     foo2()
     foo3()

that is, the logical change is that foo1 is renamed foo1_another_new_name. On the other hand, git show HEAD:<filename> shows

def foo1_new_name():
    print("foo1")

...

def main():
    foo1_new_name()
    foo2()
    foo3()

There is nothing called foo1! This is a genuine semantic conflict. Should the new name of foo1 be foo1_new_name or foo1_another_new_name? The knowledge required to answer that question is not contained within the conflict markers of the merge conflict. Local reasoning can’t help. You now have to think globally about the meaning of the two branches in question.

Conclusion

Resolving rebase conflicts is straightforward as long as you have a clear idea of what the logically-intended changes introduced by the rebased commit are, and you can see the state of base branch that you need to apply them to—and there is semantic compatibility between the two!

The git tooling can be used to provide useful information. It’s not ideal though. I explore a better conflict marker format in Better display for git rebase conflicts.

References

I found David Winterbottom’s article on the same topic helpful when writing this one.